The Point Person for FSMA Food Safety

One requirement of the new food safety law is the creations of a new position, the so-called “Qualified Individual.” He/she will be the point person to insure food manufacturing and processing plants, as well as shippers and importers, are operating with carefully drawn up preventive control-based food safety plans.

Who, exactly, is this qualified individual? What is he/she responsible for?

First, a bit of background. The new food safety law, known by the acronym FSMA, requires all food manufacturers and processors to conduct a detailed analysis of possible food contamination points throughout their facilities. From that analysis, a plant-wide food safety plan must be created in order for the facility to gain compliance with the law (or eventually face penalties). That plan must emphasize concrete, specific steps to prevent contamination at every step in the manufacturing process.

Someone has to manage all of these details, and that designee is the Qualified Individual (also called a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual, or PCQI). Some companies already have such a person, perhaps a food safety director or specialist. But others companies, especially smaller-sized operations, will have to create this job and fill it with either a current employee, a new hire, or by using an outside consultant.

Here is the position as described by the FDA:

A preventive controls qualified individual is someone who has successfully completed certain training in the development and application of risk-based preventive controls or is otherwise qualified through job experience to develop and apply a food safety system. The written food safety plan required of food facilities must be prepared, or its preparation overseen, by one or more preventive controls qualified individuals. And the preventive controls qualified individual is charged with overseeing the validation that preventive controls are capable of controlling identified hazards and the records review.

What about training? What’s required?

In advance of FSMA implementation, an industry-academic-government consortium called the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA) was established to translate the law’s many requirements into a comprehensive curriculum for those interested in (or assigned to) becoming a qualified individual. The requirements are set out here in Q and A form. However, the FDA has also enabled training to be much more flexible, as long as the curriculum meets the FSPCA’s standards. Food safety training, in fact, has spawned a cottage industry with courses available in many locations as well as online. Google “Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Training courses” and you will see listed numerous training courses available.

The Preventive Controls Qualified Individual isn’t the only person responsible for  a company’s food safety. FSMA also incorporates what is known as the “Park Doctrine” that makes a manufacturing company’s top executive directly responsible for food safety oversight. Additionally, the law requires that the food safety plan is shared with all employees through meetings, presentations and one-on-one sessions. Moreover, the plan must be revised and updated every three years.

All of this — the required food safety plan, preventive controls, qualified individual training and executive oversight — represents a sea change in government regulation of the food supply (for humans and animals). Food safety has long been a voluntary industry priority, but and the continuing scourage of deadly foodborne illness recalls and microbiological contaminations demonstrated that stronger protections were needed. FSMA is the result.

The new requirements also bring a new sensibility to food production and distribution. It is the awareness that food safety must be not just a management priority, but also an attitude that becomes ingrained and habitual at all levels of the massive global food supply chain. It heralds a culture of food safety which, if it truly takes hold in the industry, holds the promise of making food fatalities a thing of the past.

 

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