FSMA’s Record-Keeping Challenge

 

Of the many new requirements in the Food Safety Modernization Act, one of the most challenging is maintaining detailed records of compliance with the new law.

It’s a requirement that going to be especially difficult for small food manufacturers, those that typically do not operate with large administrative staffs. Even though small businesses (defined as those with less than 500 FTE employees) have until August 30, 2017 to achieve compliance, they still face a challenge: who are they going to tap to manage the array of records FSMA requires?

In fact, industry experts point out, FSMA requires that companies assign a management-level person to handle the record keeping, as well as an internal auditor to insure that the records are accurate and honest.

This will be no small assignment. FSMA’s record keeping regulations will require constant attention, for one thing, because the law says FDA inspectors can ask to review the records on just 24-hour notice. For another, once the August grace period ends and enforcement begins, operators who don’t meet the record keeping requirements could face costly fines.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) justifies the records maintenance requirement as being cost-effective in the long run. “We estimate that processed foods covered by this rulemaking are responsible for approximately 903,000 foodborne illnesses each year, at a total cost to the American public of approximately $2.2 billion,” FDA’s economic analysis of the rule explains.

Another wrinkle in FSMA is that the company’s records must be available whenever the FDA comes calling.  “Currently, the FDA only has broad records access in emergency situations when it uses authority granted by the Bioterrorism Act,” explained Maile Gradison Hermida, an Associate with the global law firm Hogan Lovells, in a 2015 Food Online blog post. “However, FSMA gives the FDA this broad records access every day, for routine inspections and without cause. The FDA will review records to assess whether you have the systems in place to make safe food and whether you are always following these programs.”

Through contractors, the FDA is offering training sessions to help companies understand the breadth of what they’ll need to keep track of: from hazard analyses to safety plans to documentation of suppliers and transporters. Still, there are common sense procedures that small and medium-sized manufacturers can implement early in 2017 (if they haven’t already been put in place):

  • Undertake a company-wide audit of existing record-keeping procedures, including how they are stored, who does the compilation, and what data might be located on cloud-based servers;
  • Assemble a FSMA compliance team that includes representatives of senior management (or ownership), operations, IT, accounting, legal and marketing. Its role would be to oversee all aspects of food safety implementation, including record-keeping and tracking. To assure efficiency, someone with the requisite experience in records handling should be designated as the team leader.
  • Invest in new technologies that will ease the record-keeping burden. Manufacturing software that monitors products throughout the manufacturing process should be a top priority. Cloud-based technology will not only provide a cost-effective way to store digital documents, but also offer an array of predictive analytics that can unearth potential production issues and also preempt alarm and failure events.

The enthusiastic buy-in of senior management to place food safety at the pinnacle of production is essential. In a very real sense, FSMA is a risk management tool intended to help companies in food production to protect their brands while maintaining product quality and safety.

Managing risk, after all, is a fundamental necessity for any business. Now, under FSMA, it can be the spur to efficient, profitable – and safe – performance.

 

 

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