FSMA and the Challenges for Small Business

FSMA BUSINESS COMPLIANCE DATES

April 30, 2017 — food safety verification for companies exporting product or ingredients to American-based small businesses;

August 30, 2017 — companies with fewer than 500 full-time employees;

August 30, 2018 — companies with annual sales of less than $1 million (for animal products, $2.5 million)

The big compliance date has come and gone, and food manufacturers and their suppliers are now subject to the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Yet in many ways, the September 2016 deadline was only the start of a new countdown to compliance for small and and very small food companies and their suppliers, domestic and foreign.

Let’s take a look by examining what “compliance” actually means to the Food and Drug Administration, the agency that governs the food industry and manages FSMA:

  • ENFORCEMENT. Although FSMA is in effect for large-scale, multinational food companies, the FDA has offered industry a grace period in which education will take precedence over enforcement. Essentially, regulators are allowing manufacturers and their suppliers an extended period of time to implement the new safety law’s many requirements without fear of citation, license revocation or a mandated food recall. However — and this is a big caveat — the FDA will crack down on “egregious” FSMA violations, defined as activities that demonstrate that a food company is willfully failing to comply with the new law.
  • SMALL BUSINESS DEADLINES. The FDA’s rules offer a helping hand to small businesses in the food industry by extending compliance deadlines for nearly a year – to August 30, 2017. What constitutes a small business? Generally, the FDA says, a small business is one with less than 500 full time equivalent employees. There is also a “very small” business category, with a somewhat different definition: a company with average annual sales of less than $1 million, including the market value of inventory on hand. (For producers of animal food, the cutoff for compliance is annual sales of $2.5 million).
  • IMPORTERS. How to insure compliance for food importers is one of the trickiest aspects of FSMA. The overall intent of the law is clear: the United States wants foreign-based suppliers of food items or ingredients to be held to the same safety standards as American-based firms. Yet the various rules governing what the FDA calls the Foreign Supplier Verification Program (FSVP) have differing compliance dates tied to the size of the importing company, where it is domiciled, and what it is shipping to the U.S. Suffice it to say that if a small American company is importing food items from overseas, it must verify the foreign supplier’s compliance with FSMA standards by April 30, 2017.
  • TRAINING & ASSISTANCE. A baked-in assumption in FDA’s rules is that large manufacturers will already have been close to compliance, but that smaller firms many not possess the budget, personnel or access to training to meet FSMA’s tough new safety standards. One solution is the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance, comprised of government, industry and academic advisors who can assist small businesses understand FSMA’s requirements and schedules through seminars, distance learning and online and printed materials.

American manufacturing is by and large driven by small business. Of some 252,000 manufacturers of all types in 2013, according to the National Association of Manufacturers, the vast majority employed fewer than 500 people, the cutoff point for FDA compliance next year, not this year.

What these numbers suggest is that reaching the thousands upon thousands of employees and persuading them to make food safety a personal responsibility will take time, effort and patience. Thankfully, the FDA has recognized the scope of the task, and is rolling out FSMA compliance in a way that helps every business adjust to the new law.

 

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