A Safer Food Supply?

Will the nation’s food supply be safer under FSMA?

The new Food Safety Modernization Act, or FSMA, which takes full effect in September, has a multitude of goals, but foremost of these is insuring that the nation’s food supply (human and animal) is safe – safer than it already is. Will the new law do that?

That was certainly the motivation for passage of FSMA in 2011. Congress recognized that the vast American food supply from farm to table was very safe, but also persistently vulnerable to microbiological contamination, accidents, and terrorist threats. FSMA addresses these dangers directly and indirectly. Here are three of the primary goals behind the new food safety regulations.

  1. Responding to the new realities of a global food chain. America’s food supply throughout much of its history has been largely self-contained: American growers, ranchers and manufacturers accounted for the vast majority of food items available to consumers. But it was never 100% domestic: Coffee from Africa and Central America; winter produce from Mexico; Canadian wheat, spice from Southeast Asia. As the consumer palate has become more varied and reflective of diverse cultures, our food supply is incredibly global in scale. FSMA is intended to insure that all food items and ingredients coming from overseas are subject to stringent safety protocols.
  1. foodmfgPlacing more aggressive regulations on suppliers, not just manufacturers. If the world’s food supply were envisioned as an iceberg, the portion above the water line would represent manufacturers, processors, and retailers. The portion of the iceberg below water – by far the largest segment – would represent the thousands upon thousands of suppliers that play a pivotal but often overlooked role in food safety. It’s a supply chain that is both widespread and granular in scope: it includes makers of conveyor equipment, as well as suppliers of lubricants for that equipment.
  1. Preventing food safety issues rather than relying upon government intervention only when there’s a problem, is at the very heart of FSMA, and one that should have the most immediate and beneficial impact on food safety over time. That’s because, for the first time, food manufacturers and processors, along with their supply chain partners, have clear direction in preventing food contamination by creating and maintaining a food safe environment up and down the supply line. One requirement alone – having in place a comprehensive food safety plan – is perhaps the single most significant of all of FSMA’s many regulations.

Of course, maintaining a 100 percent safe food supply is literally impossible. But as an aspirational goal, FSMA represents forward thinking on the part of the government and the food industry, both of which have an obvious, vested interest in producing and selling products that are as safe as they can possibly be.

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